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Hannah // 19 // the land of sunny skies and windy breezes all year round (That's Borneo for you!) -

Glimpses into everyday life and things that catch my attention!

I'm friendly so don't hesitate to drop me a message :)

inwhichifeelallthefeels:

fluffyfit:

surimistick:

i was making a lot of mistakes and then my archery instructor said:

“you make mistakes because you’re focusing on the target and not on your actions”

and i was like woah

thanks for giving me the best life advice i’ve ever gotten

guys just think about how applicable this is to EVERYFUCKINGTHING

I’m really glad you brought this back because honestly I want to get this tattooed on my face.

(via ichoosesuccess)

— 3 days ago with 337760 notes

WHO CARES IF I’M PRETTY IF I FAIL MY FINALS

(Source: fckyeahgilmoregirls.tumblr.cpm, via thehappysunflower)

— 3 days ago with 17263 notes
#finals 

Sometimes I question whether it really is worth the wait. Should I really just wait. Despite everything that I’ve been told.

It just feels like there’s no point waiting any more. When everything around me is showing me that waiting…. Doesn’t really bring much difference.

— 4 days ago
#personal 
neuromorphogenesis:

How memories stick together
Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event.
This new framework provides a more complete picture of how memory works, which can inform research into disorders liked Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, post-traumatic stress and learning disabilities.
"Previous models of memory were based on fast activity patterns," says Terrence Sejnowski, holder of Salk’s Francis Crick Chair and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. “Our new model of memory makes it possible to integrate experiences over hours rather than moments.”
Over the past few decades, neuroscientists have revealed much about how long-term memories are stored. For significant events—for example, being bit by a dog—a number of proteins are quickly made in activated brain cells to create the new memories. Some of these proteins linger for a few hours at specific places on specific neurons before breaking down.
This series of biochemical events allow us to remember important details about that event—such as, in the case of the dog bite, which dog, where it was located and so on.
One problem scientists have had with modeling memory storage is explaining why only selective details and not everything in that 1-2 hour window is strongly remembered. By incorporating data from previous literature, Sejnowski and first author Cian O’Donnell, a Salk postdoctoral researcher, developed a model that bridges findings from both molecular and systems observations of memory to explain how this 1-2 hour memory window works. The work is detailed in the latest issue of Neuron.
Using computational modeling, O’Donnell and Sejnowski show that, despite the proteins being available to a number of neurons in a given circuit, memories are retained when subsequent events activate the same neurons as the original event. The scientists found that the spatial positioning of proteins at both specific neurons and at specific areas around these neurons predicts which memories are recorded. This spatial patterning framework successfully predicts memory retention as a mathematical function of time and location overlap.
"One thing this study does is link what’s happing in memory formation at the cellular level to the systems level," says O’Donnell. "That the time window is important was already established; we worked out how the content could also determine whether memories were remembered or not. We prove that a set of ideas are consistent and sufficient to explain something in the real world."
The new model also provides a potential framework for understanding how generalizations from memories are processed during dreams.
While much is still unknown about sleep, research suggests that important memories from the day are often cycled through the brain, shuttled from temporary storage in the hippocampus to more long-term storage in the cortex. Researchers observed most of this memory formation in non-dreaming sleep. Little is known about if and how memory packaging or consolidation is done during dreams. However, O’Donnell and Sejnowski’s model suggests that some memory retention does happen during dreams.
"During sleep there’s a reorganizing of memory—you strengthen some memories and lose ones you don’t need anymore," says O’Donnell. "In addition, people learn abstractions as they sleep, but there was no idea how generalization processes happen at a neural level."
By applying their theoretical findings on overlap activity within the 1-2 hour window, they came up with a theoretical model for how the memory abstraction process might work during sleep.
Image: The hippocampus is a region of the brain largely responsible for memory formation. Courtesy of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

neuromorphogenesis:

How memories stick together

Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event.

This new framework provides a more complete picture of how memory works, which can inform research into disorders liked Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, post-traumatic stress and learning disabilities.

"Previous models of memory were based on fast activity patterns," says Terrence Sejnowski, holder of Salk’s Francis Crick Chair and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. “Our new model of memory makes it possible to integrate experiences over hours rather than moments.”

Over the past few decades, neuroscientists have revealed much about how long-term memories are stored. For significant events—for example, being bit by a dog—a number of proteins are quickly made in activated brain cells to create the new memories. Some of these proteins linger for a few hours at specific places on specific neurons before breaking down.

This series of biochemical events allow us to remember important details about that event—such as, in the case of the dog bite, which dog, where it was located and so on.

One problem scientists have had with modeling memory storage is explaining why only selective details and not everything in that 1-2 hour window is strongly remembered. By incorporating data from previous literature, Sejnowski and first author Cian O’Donnell, a Salk postdoctoral researcher, developed a model that bridges findings from both molecular and systems observations of memory to explain how this 1-2 hour memory window works. The work is detailed in the latest issue of Neuron.

Using computational modeling, O’Donnell and Sejnowski show that, despite the proteins being available to a number of neurons in a given circuit, memories are retained when subsequent events activate the same neurons as the original event. The scientists found that the spatial positioning of proteins at both specific neurons and at specific areas around these neurons predicts which memories are recorded. This spatial patterning framework successfully predicts memory retention as a mathematical function of time and location overlap.

"One thing this study does is link what’s happing in memory formation at the cellular level to the systems level," says O’Donnell. "That the time window is important was already established; we worked out how the content could also determine whether memories were remembered or not. We prove that a set of ideas are consistent and sufficient to explain something in the real world."

The new model also provides a potential framework for understanding how generalizations from memories are processed during dreams.

While much is still unknown about sleep, research suggests that important memories from the day are often cycled through the brain, shuttled from temporary storage in the hippocampus to more long-term storage in the cortex. Researchers observed most of this memory formation in non-dreaming sleep. Little is known about if and how memory packaging or consolidation is done during dreams. However, O’Donnell and Sejnowski’s model suggests that some memory retention does happen during dreams.

"During sleep there’s a reorganizing of memory—you strengthen some memories and lose ones you don’t need anymore," says O’Donnell. "In addition, people learn abstractions as they sleep, but there was no idea how generalization processes happen at a neural level."

By applying their theoretical findings on overlap activity within the 1-2 hour window, they came up with a theoretical model for how the memory abstraction process might work during sleep.

Image: The hippocampus is a region of the brain largely responsible for memory formation. Courtesy of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

— 6 days ago with 151 notes
#science 

rootswillbindus:

duplication:

don’t cross oceans for people who wouldn’t cross a puddle for you.

No, do it. Do cross oceans for people. Love people, all people. No conditions attached, no wondering wether or not they’re worthy. Cross oceans, climb mountains. Life and love isn’t about what you gain, it’s about what you give.

^ AMEN.

(via immersedinhim)

— 6 days ago with 185980 notes
aseaofquotes:

Louisa May Alcott, Little Women

aseaofquotes:

Louisa May Alcott, Little Women

— 6 days ago with 864 notes

helioscentrifuge:

sophienorthcott:

chlorinda:

potential-and-difference:

shmiling:

n0thingleftinside:

fuckyeahprisoninmates:

Robert Glenn, an inmate in the Special Housing Unit (SHU) at Corcoran State Prison in California killed two inmates while in prison. He believes these murders were justified because both men were convicted rapists, one of whom was accused of raping his sister from the age of 8 to 14.

I never thought I would admire a murder

Did you know that in most criminals frown upon rapists and molesters  If they find out that they raped or molested a woman they usually treat them terribly like beating them up, or making them die. Criminals don’t even accept that.

Absolutely true, because if you think about it they have families and perhaps kids. If they find out you’re a child molester they are going to hate you.

Sometimes when child molesters go to jail, even the guards are lied to about what the molester did to go there. They sometimes make up a false crime to protect the molester from serious injury.

Ain’t it fucked up that even hardened criminals realise rape is fucking wrong no matter what, but there are some government officials that cannot?

that last fucking comment tho

One of my biggest conflicts is the fact that my religion tells me to love and forgive because everyone deserves grace.

But I don’t know if I could forgive a rapist or child molester.

(via theunchainedreaction)

— 6 days ago with 413360 notes
Oh Lord, an exact representation of my life

Oh Lord, an exact representation of my life

(Source: amajor7, via jellybeanpancakes)

— 1 week ago with 202688 notes
#personal